Canadians Win Another Round Against the Bank of Canada

“The COMER case in Canada is very significant…Absolutely. This (Canadian model) could catch on with other banks around the world…There are lots of nations looking at this right now.”

Bill Still, Economist
Press for Truth with Dan Dicks
Suing the Bank — What’s Next for the Canadian Money Masters? (video)
Published February 12, 2015

 

by Jane Gaffin

Every Canadian has a vested interest in COMER (Committee on Monetary and Economic Reform) v the Bank of Canada.

Yet the so-called mainstream media has not mentioned the Federal Court decision of January 26, 2015 that is a ‘good news’ story for all Canadians who are the rightful owners of the Bank of Canada, which is a unique and enviable position in the world where all other central banks are privately-owned.

The judgement delivered from the bench in Toronto was an historic, landmark decision which makes it even more puzzling why Toronto-based constitutional lawyer Rocco Galati, who normally receives wall-to-wall publicity on his constitutional challenges, received no ink or airtime on this particular case.

YouthVoteCanada picked up the slack and produced a video titled A Conversation w/Constitutional Lawyer Rocco Galati who graciously explained the success of the Bank of Canada lawsuit immediately following the ruling.

The upper court upheld the lower court’s decision from April 24, 2014. Yes, there were dismissals of this and dismissals of that and one thing and another. As is normal procedure, the Crown wanted the case dumped as “frivolous”.

However, the Motion was not struck down, which renders this a ‘win’, and the Bank of Canada has 60 days to appeal to the Supreme Court of Canada. It is not anticipated that the government will choose to exercise that option but that remains to be seen.

The case is still on the books and is still moving forward as it has since the initial filing on December 12, 2011 when Rocco Galati launched a case on behalf of plaintiffs William Krehm, Ann Emmett and COMER in the federal court against the Queen of England, Minister of Finance, Minister of National Revenue, the Bank of Canada and the Attorney General of Canada.

As per the recent decision, plaintiffs Krehm, Emmett and COMER (Committee on Monetary and Economic Reform) have 60 days from January 26 to refile an Amended Statement of Claim, then presumably advance to trial for a couple more years of legal proceedings.

The Bank of Canada was nationalized in 1938 to bring Canada out of the Great Depression by injecting debt-free money into infrastructure projects: airports, subway systems, highways, St. Lawrence Seaway, Canadian Health Care System, Canadian Pension System as well as the Trans Canada Highway and setting up hospitals, schools, universities and offering affordable means for students to earn their diplomas without drowning in lifetime debts.

The Bank of Canada made interest-free loans to the municipal, provincial and federal governments, a provision still mandated under the Bank of Canada Act.

The Bank of Canada used to be a government lending institution, creating near interest-free loans that built much of Canada’s infrastructure during the 1950s and 1960s.

Things changed in 1974. At the Bank of International Settlements in Basel, Switzerland, which doesn’t appear to have settled a transaction since then, former Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, under influence of fellow Bilderberg attendees, allowed for the function of the Bank of Canada to be dismantled.

Since then, Canada has lost sovereign control over its monetary policies and money supply. Every Canadian has been saddled with government debt at all levels that has risen exponentially over the last 40 years.

This case before the courts revolves around that stifling of the Bank of Canada’s mandate to create money for the public good.

As lifted from Press for Truth, September 10, 2012 (because my computer couldn’t read the fuzzy pdf version), “The Plaintiffs state that the Bank of International Settlements (BIS), the Financial Stability Forum (FSF) and the International Monetary Fund (IMF) [a special agency of the United Nations] were all created with the cognizant intent of keeping poorer nations in their place which has now expanded to all nations in that these financial institutions largely succeed in overriding governments and constitutional orders in countries such as Canada over which they exert financial control.”

Further, the Plaintiffs state that the meetings of the Bank of International Settlements and Financial Stability Board (FSB) (successor of FSF), their minutes, their discussions and deliberations are secret and not available nor accountable to Parliament, the executive, nor the Canadian public, notwithstanding that the Bank of Canada policies directly emanate from these meetings.

“These organizations are essentially private, foreign entities controlling Canada’s banking system and socio-economic policies,” they charged.

The Plaintiffs state that the defendants (officials) are unwittingly and/or wittingly, in varying degrees, knowledge and intent engaged in a conspiracy, along with the BIS, FSB, IMF to render impotent the Bank of Canada Act as well as Canadian sovereignty over financial, monetary, and socio-economic policy, and bypass the sovereign rule of Canada through its Parliament by means of banking and financial systems.

Constitutional lawyer Galati reminded that when initially enacted in 1937-38, the Bank could directly provide interest-free loans to the federal, provincial and municipalities for infrastructure and human capital expenditures so long as it didn’t exceed one-third the annual budget and as long as it was repaid within the next fiscal year which governments had no problem doing because no interest was attached to the loans.

“That practice stopped in 1974 when the Bank of Canada joined the gang of bankers over in Europe,” noted Galati.

“The only difference between our Bank and the other banks is our Bank is a public Bank. It is the only Bank that is a public bank in the GA [United Nations General Assembly] countries. The other banks are private banks, including the Federal Reserve in the States. Most people don’t realize that.

“If the Bank of Canada can give (money) to the commercial banks at one quarter of one percent they should be able to give money to the government at least at one quarter of one percent — or zero percent — as the Bank of Canada is mandated to do.”

He added that this legal claim has a lot of basis. “It’s grounded in law. If we get a dishonest judge, she or he will strike parts or all of it. We’ll appeal it. But there’s nothing in this statement of claim that we want the government to fess up to that’s not grounded in solid, legal argument.”

With regards to motions, Galati stated, if the [Bank of Canada] loses on this one they have to file their substantive defense.

They can’t put in the Statement of Defense ‘there’s no reasonable cause of action’. They’ve spent that fuel, he said.

They have to actually justify why they haven’t been giving interest-free loans to the government. They have to justify why the Minutes of these Meetings in Zurich are kept secret. They have to justify why the Minister of Justice is not tabling the true figures of revenue coming in. They have to justify this in law.

“There’s no such thing as a failure when you bring a matter to the courts that’s ripe for adjudication. The failure is in not bringing it forward and raising the issue,” he concluded.

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Dismantling Industrial Civilization is on the Agenda

 

by Jane Gaffin

From the 1976  forewarning files…

Over the years, the United Nations Agenda 21’s insidious, ever-expanding tentacles have reached out globally in every direction to surreptitiously encapsulate every facet of people’s lives while they weren’t paying attention.

Agenda 21 — which simply means a blueprint as to how a New World Order will dictate how society will live and behave in the 21st Century — didn’t get a serious toehold on its radical scheme until its 1992 environmental conference in Rio de Janeiro where the ultimate plan of action was concocted to take humanity backwards into another Dark Age.

To save planet earth from destruction meant the elimination of all human activity, plus, as a little sidebar, the pogrom called for the extinguishment of middle-class society and the extermination of at least three-quarters of the world population.

One of the initial steps to successful implementation was the dismantling of industrial civilization and, in Marxist fashion, relieving individuals and corporations of their right to own property — whether that be an expansive farm, a plot of land for a house, or mining claims — and the withdrawal of all leases and licenses to government-controlled lands for grazing cattle, big-game guiding, placer and hard rock mining, and any other private enterprises.

Below is a prophetic article, Who Gets the Blame? Hit by Strikes Yukon Economy Suffers, that appeared September 30, 1976 as the lead in the Toronto-based Northern Miner, the Bible of the worldwide mining industry. It demonstrates in spades the enormous international ramifications and ripple effect of how society suffers the backlash when governments and a few power-hungry individuals start toying with industrial civilization “for fun”.

At the relevant time, the Yukon was blindsided with a severe blow said to be a protest to the Anti-Inflation Board.

The Anti-Inflation Act was a contentious parliamentary act passed in 1975 by Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau’s Liberal government in Ottawa supposedly as a measure to slow down inflation that was blamed on an out-of-control increase in commodity prices and wages government and companies were paying to employees.

The unpopular law was met with an angry counterblast from virtually every sector of society. The populace is just now beginning to comprehend what is really in store for the future.

No ordinary person could fathom what evilness invisible global elitists were plotting behind closed doors 38 years ago. By now, there is no doubt. And the draconian fallout from Agenda 21 is not going to be pretty as it continues coiling conspiratorially around us everyday like a big sneaky snake stalking its unsuspecting prey.

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What a mess!

Worried Yukoners tough-sledded through the summer when labor disputes crippled the $228 million mining industry, the Yukon’s No. 1 support.

Now the 22,000 residents face an uncertain winter under guidance of a new commissioner, an anemic economy dropping faster than the mercury in the thermometer at $100,000 per day, and the provincehood issue crescendoing.

Things got hot in the summer. Simultaneously, United Steelworkers (USW) closed three of the Yukon’s four operating mines, plus the Cassiar Asbestos mine in Northern British Columbia, near the Yukon border.

Labor disputes disrupted operations at Whitehorse Copper, United Keno Hill Mines (UKHM) at Elsa, and Cyprus Anvil Mining at Faro.

As temperatures dipped into September, United Keno finally reached a settlement with the union. The miners are getting back to work and production is up to 40 per cent of normal, but the agreement has yet to be ratified by the Anti-Inflation Board. At Cyprus Anvil, no thaw is in sight and the mine is still shut down, while Whitehorse Copper workers are back on the job earning a base hourly wage of $6.10.

The only mine uninterrupted by labor problems was Clinton Creek Mine, northwest of Dawson City, eight miles from the Alaska border.

The Clinton employees are Canadian Mine Workers, their negotiations concerned with severance pay and move-out allowances.

Owned by Cassiar Asbestos, Clinton has been exhausted of commercial-grade fibres, and a permanent closure is expected early next year.

In mid-September, the Cassiar subsidiary of Territorial Supply, an International Harvester franchise in Whitehorse, closed after 25 years of service. The Transport Division is continuing to haul fibre from Clinton to railhead at Whitehorse.

THE COMPLEX ISSUE

The Cyprus Anvil lead-zinc mine, the Yukon’s largest mine, is directly responsible for half the Yukon’s economy. When the 10,000-ton-per-day operation is immobilized, two-thirds of the territory is paralyzed.

Major strikes have erupted there three times this year, and helped start the economy on its roller-coaster path nine months ago.

In late July, the 400 United Steelworkers members entered their latest strike, ostensibly a protest against the Anti-Inflation Board’s substantial roll back in their wage and benefit contract from 36 to a 9 per cent increase in the first year.

The union insisted it wasn’t a strike against the company, therefore Cyprus Anvil tried to avert the work stoppage by offering to join the union in an organized approach to the Anti-Inflation Board about the revision decision.

A local news analyst, Don Sawatsky, reported an ebullient spirit in Faro, with campers packed before the union opted to strike. He said they just didn’t realize the seriousness of that decision.

The new contract, retroactive to October of last year, was for an hourly base rate of $7.

Not only did the strike decision drastically hamper the Yukon, but Faro activities can be felt many places. Skagway, Alaska is the port-of-call where ships load ore concentrates destined to customers in Japan and European countries.

While 1,500 residents from the Yukon’s second-largest community are fishing, a lot of people are sitting around in wide-eyed amazement wondering where the concentrates went.

Ironically, Faro, constructed in 1969, hasn’t been inked onto many maps. But the little town sure packs a wallop.

Presently, Yukoners have lost track of who’s mad at whom, what the strike’s all about. This week the Canadian Labor Relations Board handed down its decision that a new agreement would have to be negotiated meeting the requirements of the Anti-Inflation Act. Thus, the obscure and complex issues are still unresolved.

Cyprus Anvil is the biggest customer for the Northern Canada Power Commission (NCPC). With the mine down, NCPC reported a loss of $200 thousand a month. The federally-owned utility company by an Act of Parliament can’t operate in the red, and requires consumers to pick up any deficits.

Yukoners fear they’re cradling another price hike in their palms. Within the last year, NCPC has raised wholesale power rates by 80 per cent to defray a $30 million override for the new 30-megawatt Aishihik power project, 80 miles northwest of Whitehorse.

Since the rate-increase protest launched by Yukoners in January, James Smith has stepped down from his 10-year service as Commissioner and turned full attention to chairmanship of NCPC.

Mr. Smith said that he’s keeping the federal people apprised of the current situation in the north, and is hopeful of a realistic solution to the problem.

He doesn’t want the federal government coming back to the Yukon this time with an excuse of “not knowing what was happening.”

The Yukon could sell stock in its northern winters. The price always promises to double. Gas pumps glared with the third petroleum increase within 13 months, gas retailing for $1.05 a gallon in Whitehorse. Outlying areas are looking at 50 cents tacked onto that. Heating fuels went as high as 64.2 cents a gallon.

It’s like gold,” a Gulf wholesale representative said, “except going the opposite direction!

The economic pressures are high, and many people from the work force of 10,000 envisage a jobless winter. Some, not taking any chances, planted “For Sale” signs in their front lawns. Even school enrollment was down by nearly 200.

And marginal-profit companies are getting more uptight by the minute about the constant increases in overhead, and wages being pushed to the hilt. They’re waiting for the inevitable — the twain to meet and drive small businesses into oblivion.

The $20 million mineral exploration industry was quiet this field season. Inactivity was blamed partially on crews having to curtail work at minesites that were embroiled in labor disputes. Another speculation for the slow-down is that large companies have been given encouragements to return to British Columbia under the Social Credit government, and companies want to search for minerals where they get the most for their shopping dollars.

This field season consisted mainly of regional follow-ups, with relatively few grassroots projects initiated in the Yukon. And helicopter operators, diamond drillers and expediters were all feeling the pinch. One helicopter pilot reported a mere 10 revenue hours flown by June 21. Normally, by that time, the exploration people would be queued up for aircraft service.

The largest Yukon transportation firm had only a skeleton fleet of diesels trickling the gravel network of roads. White Pass and Yukon Route laid off 90 per cent of the 133 drivers, and a total lay off of 287 employees.

Five men were rehired to service at Whitehorse Copper and Cassiar Asbestos when the two mines returned to work in late summer; however, it’s expected to take time to regain full mining operations.

White Pass ship and train schedules slackened. Ships sail the west coast from Vancouver to Skagway, Alaska with commodities destined the 110-miles farther to Whitehorse by White Pass narrow-gauge rail.

The Chamber of Commerce has been beating the bushes for answers to the economic strife. Local entrepreneurs reported a 15 per cent reduction in business, and blamed the decrease in their profits on the labor situation in the mining industry.

However, tourism was also down considerably this summer.

The Chamber president said, “We’re at a loss as to what to do. It’s a delicate situation. Hopefully, the unions and managements can get started on some meaningful dialogue.”

It’s virtually impossible to estimate accurately a figure of revenue loss in the territory, especially through taxes lost in unpaid wages and the congealment of cash flow to the retail market. However, one of the largest sources of income to the territory is through fuel taxes. A half million has been lost from the trucks that are being mothballed and aren’t bringing in the 16 cents per gallon road tax.

Regardless of when industry resumes full-speed-ahead productivity, it’s predicted to take two years to wash away the stickiness after being in the jam jar.

Merv Miller said, “Even when the economy rolls again, there’ll be a long-term impact for both government and industry.” The assistant commissioner said he thinks labor and management must reach the common denominator goal — earning money. But returning to work still squabbling with each other won’t solve anything, he remarked.

“Mines shouldn’t take all the blame,” Mr. Miller continued. “The economy peaked in July last year and has been on a plateau since that time.”

He said, “There’s little we can do now, except wait.

The territorial government is waiting to the tune of $150 thousand per month direct revenue losses.

Dr. Jack Hibbard, a member of the Yukon’s legislative assembly (MLA), said, “The Yukon can’t withstand the pressure of the work stoppage any longer. If legislation is the route, let’s take it.

But he’s apprehensive that legislation will further alienate labor, management and the Anti-Inflation Board.

He suggested that Commissioner Art Pearson make representation to the federal government, unions and mine managements. The Commissioner will be sitting in on negotiations as a non-partisan observer to obtain original information, instead of the second-hand knowledge that has been prevalent in the past.

Dr. Pearson was appointed Commissioner by the Liberal government and succeeded James Smith in July.

UNION CONTEST

Faro union members said they’d quit if forced back to work by legislation, and threatened that the Yukon wouldn’t be able to hire tradesmen under the current rates.

Cassiar’s getting more an hour than we are,” complained one United Steelworker member at Faro. Cassiar went back to work with a base wage of $7.30 an hour.

In March, at a United Steelworkers mining conference in Whitehorse, a personal contest developed between two local presidents.

Bob Yorke and Stu McCall, the meeting chairman, had a succinct discussion over which union local would get the highest contract in the shortest negotiating time.

Mr. Yorke, USW local president at Cassiar, said, “Cassiar’s not worried about matching Faro. We’re going to do it in less than nine months. We’ll do it in two months.”

He asked that all unions stick together to ensure good contracts for all mines.

At Faro for six years, Mr. McCall, who’s recently resigned as local president, turns the Yukon’s economy on and off like a faucet. The Englishman, also an elected member of the Yukon’s legislative assembly, was a machinist in the paper trade before coming to Canada.

“I don’t like mining,” he said. His plans are to stay until the mine’s finished to be sure that development is done properly.

“The mining industry is immature,” he commented. “It takes risks, gambles, and is financially greedy. That makes it difficult to fight inflation in the North, because of that greed from top to bottom.”

Mr. McCall said that the company had intended to shut the mine down for the winter anyway — strike or not.

But spokesman for Cyprus Anvil, Barry Redfern, refuted the accusations. “We want to get the mine fully operational as soon as possible.”

FINALE

Bob Hilker questioned the righteousness of 400 Steelworkers taking on the Anti-Inflation Board. The consulting geologist said, “It’s fishy!”

Mr. Hilker, with his Whitehorse firm, R.G. Hilker, Ltd., is vice-chairman of the local chapter of the CIM (Canadian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy).

“Labor is getting too expensive,” he remarked. “It’s going to put Canada’s minerals out of the market.”

He said, “There’s no way the Yukoners can continue to pay revenue losses for a multi-million dollar industry. The Yukon needs legislation with teeth in it.”

He thinks provincehood may be the answer.

The undaunted Erik Nielsen, the Yukon’s Member of Parliament, continues tabling resolutions for Yukon provincial status in Parliament. This session will be no exception to the rule for Mr. Nielsen’s endeavors. As usual, resolutions aren’t expected to pass.

MLA Fred Berger said that the Yukon can raise only 80 per cent of the gross revenue needed to run the territory. Mr. Berger, leader of the Yukon’s NDP (New Democratic Party), said, “Provincial status is the wrong issue. It’s responsible government we want, the running of our day-to-day affairs.”

Commissioner Pearson is sympathetic to the concept of self-government for the Yukon. In November, the new commissioner will sit for the first time with the 12 elected members when the Yukon legislative assembly reconvenes.

Stay tune, as they say! The whole Yukon issue may be the survival of the fittest!

– 30 –

 

Hanging By a Hair: Destruction of the Middle-Class

by Jane Gaffin

(This article, based on the policies emanating from the United Nations’ Agenda 21–a blueprint for engineering and transforming society into a New World Order of serfs in the 21st Century–is a relic from my scrapbook. It was originally published as Middle-Class Society: Hanging by a Hair in the Whitehorse Star on November 10, 2000.)

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The Liberals had the mandate to call a federal election for November 27 (2000). But the Alliance set the campaign agenda.

Alliance Leader Stockwell Day’s drum-beating to take a machete to the taxes and reduce government spending is nothing new. Economists and public-policy watchdogs have harped on the subject for over 25 years.

But, most importantly, which of the two frontrunners has the political pluck to actually carry through with promises and put the beleaguered country back on the rails?

Prime Minister Jean Chretien and his disciples had seven years to correct the legacy bequeathed by former Liberal Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau.

During the 1993 campaign, Mr. Chretien promised to abolish the seven-per-cent GST (Goods and Services Tax) introduced by Brian Mulroney’s Conservatives in January 1991. Once elected, Mr. Chretien read every excuse in the Red Book as to why he wouldn’t scrap the tax.

The burden of tax collection fell on the shoulders of the private sector. Business was forced to accept the complex, time-consuming task without any compensation.

It created an extra layer of work and an extra layer of cost to do business which had to be passed on to consumers.

Extra taxes, disguised as user fees, continue to be introduced at all levels of government to service Canadians’ rich taste for champagne on a poor-man’s beer budget.

In turn, the spending power of the dollar has shrunk while real wages for the average after-tax family income is nearly the same as in 1976.

Sane Canadians want a reasonable bang for their buck based on reasonable tax levels. The others don’t want to give up any social and subsidized programs.

For years, Canada has lived well beyond its means and is ranked as one of the most severely indebted industrialized countries (SIC).

The large deficit–still hovering near $600 billion despite the Liberal government’s feeble attempt to reduce it–keeps tax rates high. As a result, everybody has experienced a reduction in standard of living, Nesbitt Burns chief economist Sherry Cooper has noted repeatedly.

Unfortunately, the situation is so bad it would have been political suicide for the Chretien government to do any more hacking to put the country’s financial house in order.

Massive government subsidizations have to be curbed, say the economists, before the Maple Leaf glory train runs out of rail with everybody on board.

Furthermore, the economy is choked by old and new regulations at every level of government. At least 25 percent of those regulations were pushed through a Parliamentary assembly line without adequate debate to ensure the best possible laws for the whole populace. Now everybody is suffering the deficiency. (See specific example, Bypassing Legislative Process is Deadly to Democracy, https://janegaffin.wordpress.com/2013/02/22/bypassing-the-legislative-process-is-deadly-to-democracy/

The blizzard of junk legislation and contradictory law is a costly legal mess which economists believe is the most overlooked challenge to Canada’s economic competitiveness.

Every time a government agency attempts to protect the environment or save individuals from daily risks, another set of regulations is passed. To comply means higher operating costs. Companies pass on additional regulatory costs to consumers by raising the prices of products and services.

Natural resource companies can’t off-load costs. If the regulatory burden proves too great, companies will deem projects uneconomic and close operations. It puts people out of work.

The heart of Canada was once based on plenty of jobs in the woods, the sawmill, fisheries, plant lines, agriculture and mining.

Now, it is an insurmountable task for ordinary folks to find meaningful work in the resource sectors, or otherwise. The masses are losing faith of fulfilling personal dreams for their prosperous futures.

Middle-class Canadians always worked hard; did a good job building this country; paid their taxes; and had some money left over for themselves.

In the prime of life, they are feeling insecure and vulnerable. Whatever went wrong was not their fault. The system did a hatchet job on the middle class, who are upset with politicians, inefficient government and a busted economy.

By the end of 1998, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) was on alert to bail Canada out of a crisis. Oblivious to lurking dangers and the creed that says ‘charity begins at home’, politicians dished out lavish increases on foreign aid.

The IMF endorsed the corrective measures suggested by the Organization for Economic Development and Cooperation: put people and capital to work; improve productivity; eliminate interprovincial trade barriers; and LOWER THE TAXES.

Productivity is the difference between labour plus capital costs and economic output. The standard of living for every Canadian was sacrificed to subsidize productivity.

Exporters have been seduced into depending on the weak loonie that trades against the stronger American greenback in currency markets. Instead of improving productivity to increase sales and keep pace with the rest of the world, Canada turned into a currency junkie.

As long as there is a significant currency advantage of Canadian goods, it is easy to mask the chronically-low productivity. The sinking loonie lessens the pressure for Canada to want to increase productivity.

It comes with a cost. Ultimately, productivity is vital to living standards in Canada, Royal Bank chief economist John McCallum has observed. “It is probably the No. 1 challenge facing this country,” he said. (McCallum was elected as a Liberal member of Parliament in the November 27, 2000 federal election.)

When fewer Canadians paying higher taxes because fewer Canadians have meaningful employment, the middle class is squeezed to the limit.

It is poised for a tax revolt and will take a large part of the economy underground…unless the elected party has the nerve to slash taxes, clean-sweep the bureaucratic house, pay down the deficit, strike down cumbersome legislation, bring back confidence for international investors, and invite the resource industries to come home.

The middle class is the backbone of any healthy society. It is comprised of the hard-working, thinking folks who cannot afford the luxury of idleness. The middle class, however, is an endangered species.

If the middle class is crushed, the chasm will widen between the two class extremes: the ultra-rich and the very poor.

The middle class is being exterminated by the environmental movement which is determined to dismantle industrial civilization piece by piece.

Ron Arnold, heralded as America’s premiere investigative critic of organized environmentalism, is the executive vice-president of the Center for the Defense of Free Enterprise.

He is author of some highly-recommended reading like Trashing the Economy: How Runaway Environmentalism is Wrecking America and EcoTerror: The Violent Agenda to Save Nature–The World of the Unabomber.

In a more recent release titled Undue Influence, he describes environmentalism as an extraordinary incestuous iron triangle of wealthy foundations, grant-driven green groups and zealous bureaucrats who control people’s future without their knowledge or permission.

Big foundations and big government give big bucks in grants to elitists green groups whose every effort hurts the average person’s economic future.

They cut off the flow of natural resources from American and Canadian federal lands, thus ending the necessary supply of timber, minerals, food and fiber.

These powerful groups have tightened their regulatory grip on private property. Real estate holders can’t use what they own–and can’t get compensation for what they lose.

Battered rural and northern communities are suffering the economic pain over banning of all forms of natural-resource production.

“Environmentalism comes with consequences,” warns Mr. Arnold.

Over 17,000 of these non-government organizations operate worldwide and make up the rampaging army of social engineers who are trampling people’s rights. (That number of government-operated, non-governmental organizations has now distended to over 40,000 GONGOs.)

“For the past several decades, politicians, bureaucrats and environmentalists have engaged in a country-wide effort to expand Canada’s network of parks and wilderness spaces,” wrote the editor in a recent issue of the Toronto-based Northern Miner.

“In British Columbia, where the ‘save-the-last-remaining-wilderness’ land grab reached mammoth proportions, forestry and mining were nearly drummed out of business,” continued Vivian Danielson.

“The economy went into a tumble, but we were told it was a small price to pay for the protection of millions of hectares of wildlife habitat.”

It turned out that the small price–a ravaged economy–was only a down payment, she advised. “The federal government now wants to extend the exercise of protecting habitat for endangered species (plant, toad, bird or insect) onto private land.”

The proposal is somewhere in the bowels of Ottawa. It is bushwackery to be committed against anybody who makes a living off the land, or a developer who creates badly-needed jobs for northern and rural residents.

Would any of these political candidates be able to stop the bureaucrats and environmentalists from assaulting people’s standard of living by laying waste to the economy?

Or does any candidate even know and care enough about the economy and humanity to effectively deal with the dilemma that leaves the destiny of the middle class hanging by a hair?

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