Canadians Win Another Round Against the Bank of Canada

“The COMER case in Canada is very significant…Absolutely. This (Canadian model) could catch on with other banks around the world…There are lots of nations looking at this right now.”

Bill Still, Economist
Press for Truth with Dan Dicks
Suing the Bank — What’s Next for the Canadian Money Masters? (video)
Published February 12, 2015

 

by Jane Gaffin

Every Canadian has a vested interest in COMER (Committee on Monetary and Economic Reform) v the Bank of Canada.

Yet the so-called mainstream media has not mentioned the Federal Court decision of January 26, 2015 that is a ‘good news’ story for all Canadians who are the rightful owners of the Bank of Canada, which is a unique and enviable position in the world where all other central banks are privately-owned.

The judgement delivered from the bench in Toronto was an historic, landmark decision which makes it even more puzzling why Toronto-based constitutional lawyer Rocco Galati, who normally receives wall-to-wall publicity on his constitutional challenges, received no ink or airtime on this particular case.

YouthVoteCanada picked up the slack and produced a video titled A Conversation w/Constitutional Lawyer Rocco Galati who graciously explained the success of the Bank of Canada lawsuit immediately following the ruling.

The upper court upheld the lower court’s decision from April 24, 2014. Yes, there were dismissals of this and dismissals of that and one thing and another. As is normal procedure, the Crown wanted the case dumped as “frivolous”.

However, the Motion was not struck down, which renders this a ‘win’, and the Bank of Canada has 60 days to appeal to the Supreme Court of Canada. It is not anticipated that the government will choose to exercise that option but that remains to be seen.

The case is still on the books and is still moving forward as it has since the initial filing on December 12, 2011 when Rocco Galati launched a case on behalf of plaintiffs William Krehm, Ann Emmett and COMER in the federal court against the Queen of England, Minister of Finance, Minister of National Revenue, the Bank of Canada and the Attorney General of Canada.

As per the recent decision, plaintiffs Krehm, Emmett and COMER (Committee on Monetary and Economic Reform) have 60 days from January 26 to refile an Amended Statement of Claim, then presumably advance to trial for a couple more years of legal proceedings.

The Bank of Canada was nationalized in 1938 to bring Canada out of the Great Depression by injecting debt-free money into infrastructure projects: airports, subway systems, highways, St. Lawrence Seaway, Canadian Health Care System, Canadian Pension System as well as the Trans Canada Highway and setting up hospitals, schools, universities and offering affordable means for students to earn their diplomas without drowning in lifetime debts.

The Bank of Canada made interest-free loans to the municipal, provincial and federal governments, a provision still mandated under the Bank of Canada Act.

The Bank of Canada used to be a government lending institution, creating near interest-free loans that built much of Canada’s infrastructure during the 1950s and 1960s.

Things changed in 1974. At the Bank of International Settlements in Basel, Switzerland, which doesn’t appear to have settled a transaction since then, former Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, under influence of fellow Bilderberg attendees, allowed for the function of the Bank of Canada to be dismantled.

Since then, Canada has lost sovereign control over its monetary policies and money supply. Every Canadian has been saddled with government debt at all levels that has risen exponentially over the last 40 years.

This case before the courts revolves around that stifling of the Bank of Canada’s mandate to create money for the public good.

As lifted from Press for Truth, September 10, 2012 (because my computer couldn’t read the fuzzy pdf version), “The Plaintiffs state that the Bank of International Settlements (BIS), the Financial Stability Forum (FSF) and the International Monetary Fund (IMF) [a special agency of the United Nations] were all created with the cognizant intent of keeping poorer nations in their place which has now expanded to all nations in that these financial institutions largely succeed in overriding governments and constitutional orders in countries such as Canada over which they exert financial control.”

Further, the Plaintiffs state that the meetings of the Bank of International Settlements and Financial Stability Board (FSB) (successor of FSF), their minutes, their discussions and deliberations are secret and not available nor accountable to Parliament, the executive, nor the Canadian public, notwithstanding that the Bank of Canada policies directly emanate from these meetings.

“These organizations are essentially private, foreign entities controlling Canada’s banking system and socio-economic policies,” they charged.

The Plaintiffs state that the defendants (officials) are unwittingly and/or wittingly, in varying degrees, knowledge and intent engaged in a conspiracy, along with the BIS, FSB, IMF to render impotent the Bank of Canada Act as well as Canadian sovereignty over financial, monetary, and socio-economic policy, and bypass the sovereign rule of Canada through its Parliament by means of banking and financial systems.

Constitutional lawyer Galati reminded that when initially enacted in 1937-38, the Bank could directly provide interest-free loans to the federal, provincial and municipalities for infrastructure and human capital expenditures so long as it didn’t exceed one-third the annual budget and as long as it was repaid within the next fiscal year which governments had no problem doing because no interest was attached to the loans.

“That practice stopped in 1974 when the Bank of Canada joined the gang of bankers over in Europe,” noted Galati.

“The only difference between our Bank and the other banks is our Bank is a public Bank. It is the only Bank that is a public bank in the GA [United Nations General Assembly] countries. The other banks are private banks, including the Federal Reserve in the States. Most people don’t realize that.

“If the Bank of Canada can give (money) to the commercial banks at one quarter of one percent they should be able to give money to the government at least at one quarter of one percent — or zero percent — as the Bank of Canada is mandated to do.”

He added that this legal claim has a lot of basis. “It’s grounded in law. If we get a dishonest judge, she or he will strike parts or all of it. We’ll appeal it. But there’s nothing in this statement of claim that we want the government to fess up to that’s not grounded in solid, legal argument.”

With regards to motions, Galati stated, if the [Bank of Canada] loses on this one they have to file their substantive defense.

They can’t put in the Statement of Defense ‘there’s no reasonable cause of action’. They’ve spent that fuel, he said.

They have to actually justify why they haven’t been giving interest-free loans to the government. They have to justify why the Minutes of these Meetings in Zurich are kept secret. They have to justify why the Minister of Justice is not tabling the true figures of revenue coming in. They have to justify this in law.

“There’s no such thing as a failure when you bring a matter to the courts that’s ripe for adjudication. The failure is in not bringing it forward and raising the issue,” he concluded.

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The United Nations and Helpers Aim to Destroy Christianity

by Jane Gaffin

A 100-foot-tall statue of Christ the Redeemer, his inviting arms opened 92-feet wide, has kept a kindly presence over his flock from atop Corcovado Mountain since the famous Rio de Janeiro landmark’s official lighting ceremony of October 12, 1931.

Somehow, supposedly tampering with the illuminating rods, the icon that reverently symbolizes Brazilian Christianity ended up flooded with garish green lights during the United Nations (UN) 10-day Rio+20  jabberwocky in late June, 2012.

One would think that when ill-mannered Marxist brats are guests in someone else’s house they could at least refrain from trashing sacred art objects.

As noted by esteemed writer Alex Newman of New American, shortly before the conference’s official opening, green legend James Lovelock — the “scientist” and environmental guru who initially introduced the whole UN “Gaia” concept to be worshipped as a one-world religious symbol — warned that the “green religion” was going to sink Christianity.

Understandably, UN critics and many Christians were outraged.

Shedding light on the matter, Newman expounded in The Real Agenda Behind UN “Sustainability” Unmasked that “Lord Christopher Monckton, a policy advisor to former U.K. Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and one of the most well-known opponents of the UN’s supposed environmental agenda, called it (the green stunt) ‘a kind of childish message that the environmental religion is now replacing Christianity,’ ”

More powerful men than James Lovelock and Simon Fish, vice president of Toronto-based BMO Financial Group, have tried unsuccessfully to wipe out Christianity for 2,000 years.

Throughout various pockets of history, Christianity has been pushed underground, even as recently as Hitler’s Nazi Germany, Stalin’s Soviet Union and Mao’s “Let a Hundred Flowers Bloom” Campaign that flushed out dissidents opposed to party ideology. The clergy was either executed or banished to hard-labour camps where many died.

But Christianity didn’t die. The spirit of God lives within people’s souls and cannot be killed.

Presently, in China, Christianity is booming, propelling the country toward becoming the world’s largest Christian nation.

A groundswell of multimillions of Protestants/Catholics/Unknowns out of a possible 1.3 billion population have the momentum going to scare the pants off members of the Communist Party who seem to realize the futility in trying to wipe out Christianity by simply toppling man-made crosses from steeples and razing stone-and-mortar buildings.

Brave Chinese Christians simply put everything back in place and wait to be arrested or for the next demolition crew to show up. So far, the only imaginative crackdown remedy President Xi could conjure up is the threat to “nationalize” the surging religion to bring Chinese Christianity into compliance with the “party line”.

Concurrently, Xi’s neighbour, Russian President Vladimir Putin seems to be cultivating Christianity into his country’s prime religion.

While Christianity gains popularity in Communist-based countries, Canada is hell bent on dumping Christianity.

That fact did not escape President Putin: “We see that many Euro-Atlantic (the Western) States have taken the way where they deny or reject their own roots, including their Christian roots which form the basis of Western civilisation.”

Canada is “following politically-correct orders” from the United Nations, the international organization that has to destroy Christianity and the Bible to eliminate the supreme, God-based constitutions governing legitimate governments of the Western World that clash with the United Nations Charter.

Under the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, an obscure Army manual cites the Christian Bible as one item that can find a person categorized as “terrorist”, “racist” or “mentally ill”. If not murdered for the transgression, the “sinner” will be forever institutionalized as a certifiable nut case.

Therefore, Christianity has to be eradicated to easily sell the masses on the ideology that national constitutions and their Bill of Rights are outmoded folly. In the Western civilization, people’s liberties and freedoms are protected as natural, God-given, inalienable rights, rooted firmly in British Common Law, Bill of Rights of 1689 and the Magna Carta of 1215, which has withstood the test of time for 800 years this June 15th.

However, through brainwashing and the gradual erosion of morality, integrity and spirituality the Marxists intend to break the back of freedom-loving countries. Carrying out the job for the United Nations are innumerable political puppets, the willing types referred to by Russian revolutionist Vladimir Lenin as “useful idiots”.

Alex Newman explains the double-dealing that goes on in the UN underbelly in his December 31, 2014 New American piece, UN Seeks to Criminalize Free Speech:

“Even the whole UN notion of ‘human rights’ should be viewed for what it is: a tool of tyrants to attack the real rights that have underpinned Western traditions since the Magna Carta.

“Indeed, unbeknownst to average Americans and humanity as a whole, the UN means something very different when it discusses ‘human rights’ than, say, the unalienable, God-given rights enshrined in the U.S. Constitution.

“In the American system, rights such as self-defense, free speech, religious liberty, trial by jury, privacy, and property ownership are endowed by the Creator upon every individual — a truth that America’s Founding Fathers viewed as “self-evident.”

Everyone — Christian or not — has a huge stake in Christianity, declared the sage columnist Dr. Paul Craig Roberts in his powerful Christmas: The Greatest Gift for All message “Whether or not we are individually believers in Christ, we are beneficiaries of the moral doctrine…”

The latest Antichrist travesty has come from the Canadian banks, owned by Canadians, the majority Christian Canadians.

I’m doing my darndest to separate the Bank of Montreal, where I’ve done business for 48 years, dating back to when banks acted like banks, from the BMO Financial Group.

Bank lawyer, Simon Fish, seems to feel there’s nothing that quite needs reforming so much as other people’s habits and beliefs. He is trying to blackmail Christians into changing their conduct code, otherwise the banks and some 70 plus Canadian corporations will see that those people are ban from finding employment anywhere in Canada, starting with professionals such as lawyers, physicians, teachers and trickling down the list to tradesmen, labourers and service workers.

The burr under Fish’s saddle started with the private, 4,000-student Trinity Western University (TWU) at Langley, British Columbia, where students practice morality and good character in their daily lives.

The faculty and students believe strongly that marriage is between a man and a woman and are committed to family values. They shun Marxist ideology of “free love” and promiscuous sex.

Fish, who probably received his marching orders from the CEO and Board, attached his signature to a March 26, 2014 letter advising the Law Society of Upper Canada to not grant accreditation to lawyers degreed at Trinity Western University.

The law societies of Nova Scotia and British Columbia, in a backflip, came onside. To date, law societies in all other Canadian jurisdictions are granting membership to TWU law graduates, but not for long if the intolerant Canadian banks get their way.

University of Ottawa-degreed lawyer Albertos Polizogopoulos, who holds to Christian beliefs, outlined in his January 9, 2015 article Christian Lawyers and Doctors Need Not Apply:

“TWU, which exists to ‘develop godly Christian leaders’ in a variety of marketplaces, requires its students and staff to sign a Community Covenant.

“This pledge, based on religious beliefs, to abstain from certain activities and behaviours during their time at TWU, includes the use of alcohol on campus, viewing pornography, and ‘sexual intimacy that violates the sacredness of marriage between a man and a woman.’

“…a concerted effort to block TWU’s law school was engaged by lawyers’ professional associations deciding to disapprove of its graduates.

“The Nova Scotia Barristers’ Society, the (Ontario) Law Society of Upper Canada and the Law Society of British Columbia each decided to refuse admission to TWU graduates to the practice of law because of TWU’s adherence to the biblical view of marriage.

“To do so, these law societies chose to disregard the Supreme Court of Canada’s 2001 decision, which ruled that a professional body could not refuse to accredit students from a TWU program because of TWU’s Community Covenant.”

In rendering the 2001 decision, Canada’s top court cited a raftload of passages from the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

Further, to be brought to the attention of BMO Financial Group and its supporters, is the Mobility Rights 6(2)(b), which was not at issue in Trinity Western University v. British Columbia College of Teachers, [2001] 1 S.C.R. 772, 2001 SCC 31.

“Every citizen of Canada and every person who has the status of a permanent resident of Canada has the right to pursue the gaining of a livelihood in any province.”

These politically-correct witchhunters, an extreme madman practice I thought went out of fashion in Salem in 1693, need to view remarks posted by TWU graduates and others in response to certain articles, specifically the Vancouver Sun’s Proposed Christian Law School at Trinity Western Under Fire Because of University’s Anti-Gay Rules.

Respondents varied in skin colouring; admitted homosexuality; or spoke of following non-Christian religious persuasions. The common denominator, however, was their enjoying and appreciating their time on TWU’s campus.

So what’s the problem? What’s wrong with aspiring to be a good person?

TWU does not reject applicants as long as they adhere to house rules like the ones by which offsprings must abide as long as they live under their parents’ roof. If the applicants don’t like the rules, they are free to enroll at any of Canada’s public law schools.

Why are the bloodthirsty Marxist busybodies whipping up a frenzy to protect students from discrimination who don’t seem to be suffering discrimination? Students posting comments did not sound like they needed or wanted outside interference.

The next time a customer service rep coos sweetly at me, “I see from your account that you don’t have a BMO Mastercard, and they’re so-o-o handy”, I have a souvenir to hand to the rep to read and share with bank colleagues.

It’s a three-pager, penned by long-time BMO customer Lou Iacobelli of Toronto, headed “Why I Will Be Cancelling My BMO Mastercard”. It spells out the sordid mess that is not a BMO Financial Group banking matter, but starkly defines a discriminatory policy that smacks of Christian bigotry.

Whereas corporations have the right to make whatever internal policies they want, I have the option to obtain a credit card from a source not connected to any of the five major Canadian banks.

The central Bank of Canada has a mandate to hold Canadians’ money in Trust, keeping it safe and secure, which is what renders the Canadian banking system the envy of the world.

My gold-plated suggestion is that the banks bow out of meddling in matters of sexuality, ethnicity and religion and get back to tending to the business of banking, thus ensuring that debts incurred gambling on the derivatives, currency and mortgage markets can be covered without having to rob middle-class depositors’ accounts and pension funds to cover losses when the bubbles pop.

Goodness is the only investment that will never fail you.

Practice it, BMO!

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UN Charter Clashes With Free-World Constitutions

by Jane Gaffin

In his inimitable style, outspoken American radio broadcaster Paul Harvey (1918 – 2009) championed love of God and country while railing against such hardcore subjects as Big Brother government.

On September 24, 1993, he went so far as to roll out the sordid facts about the United Nations on his long-standing ABC show The Rest of the Story.

“One would think by listening to all the propaganda about the United Nations that they are some sort of benevolent, peaceful organization,” began Mr. Harvey.

“Never in the history of the United Nations has it stood for anything but killing and violence. They have never kept peace anywhere on this globe. Their sole function is to replace the U.S. military — dissolve all four branches of our armed forces.

“Their allegiance is only to the United Nations Charter which does not recognize the U.S. Constitution. This body is made up almost exclusively of communists and leaders of the bloodiest regimes on this globe.

“Their history and operating agenda is apparent to anyone who takes the time to sincerely and with an open mind, research the facts of this organization, separating truth from myth.

“Bilderberg participants — another group committed to one-world domination — in 1992 called for ‘conditioning the public to accept the idea of a U.N. army that could, by force, impose its will on the internal affairs of any nation.’ “

Too bad more people didn’t heed Mr. Harvey’s wisdom and echo his sentiments before the United Nations and Bilderberg Group succeed in gobbling down the last morsels of freedom, sovereignty and peace, which would have happened sooner except for the unexpected Internet wild card that did wonders for momentarily cooling the overheated jets of the psychopaths.

As Mr. Harvey mentioned, the UN is not an instrument of peace. Wherever one stumbles often across “peace” in the UN Charter, written in classic Orwellian Newspeak, the word literally denotes “war”.

The phrase “human rights” means those the UN deems to qualify, mainly Muslims and Communists.

“Freedom of religion” dictates that only those accepting the state’s One-World religion have “religious freedom”, which ostensibly is based on Islam.

Christians are being slain, along with their concepts of Christianity and God. The state regards anybody who owns a Christian Bible — much less reads it –to be an infidel, who, if not murdered, will be institutionalized as a certifiable nut case. Christianity has to be eradicated to easily sell the masses on the ideology that national constitutions and their Bill of Rights are outmoded folly.

Below, as a companion to Mr. Harvey’s introduction, is an undated article, U.N. Charter Clashes with Constitution, reprinted sometime after 1960 in the Masonic Home Journal.

The account mentions that an effort to make property rights a part of the UN Declaration of Human Rights failed in the United Nations in 1960.

The United Nations Charter was signed in San Francisco, California, on June 26, 1945, and ratified two days later by the U.S. Senate. As well, reference is made to the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), a special agency also formed in 1945.

Although the Charter article is United States-specific, it relates closely to other sovereign nations, especially in the Western World, where people’s rights and freedoms are protected as natural, God-given, inalienable, and are rooted firmly in British Common Law, the Magna Carta of 1215 and Bill of Rights of 1689.

However, it is through the destruction of morality, spirituality and brainwashing that free-market countries, specifically the U.S., “will drop in our hands like over-ripe fruit,” as Vladimir Lenin, Bolshevik Leader of the Russian Communists, put it.

Even Communist Leader Nikita Khrushchev assured confidently that communism would take over America without firing a shot. (Basically, the world views the U.S. and Canada as a singular “America”.)

The New Order of Adolf Hitler’s Nazi Germany has stood on the world’s threshold in the form of a totalitarian One-World Order society far too long. Yet there is a glimmer of indication that at this late date the political winds may be shifting.

As recently as October, 2014, Russian President Vladimir Putin and other outspoken world leaders, disgruntled with the hegemonic United Nations and its United States lapdog dictating how sovereign nations of the world will conduct their domestic affairs, addressed a forum on the subject of New World Order: New Rules or No Rules? (See transcript here.)

And to think it all started because a warped bunch of power-hungry screwballs decided to unilaterally enshrine a destructive One-World Disorder into a damnable U.N. Charter in 1945.

Exactly what constitutes the differences between the U.S. Constitution and the United Nations’ Charter? questioned the writer of the Masonic Home Journal essay.

The Constitution is a concise document; it is very clear in its meaning and specific in its terminology — despite confused interpretations of it on high.

The UN Charter, on the other hand, is so worded that even its framers were not certain about its meaning. Its provisions have been construed in many ways.

The Constitution guarantees certain rights and Freedoms which shall not be abridged. The UN Charter threatens to eliminate such basic rights as trial by jury, a right won in 1215 A.D. by our ancestors.

The Proposed UN Covenant on Human Rights says that Freedom of the press, one of our treasured rights, may be withdrawn “if necessary for the protection of national security, public order, safety, health or morals or the rights of others.”

Article 2 of the Proposed UN Covenant goes on: “Many of the rights ostensibly guaranteed in the covenant, including Freedom of the press, may be withdrawn during an emergency officially proclaimed by the authorities.”

What about Freedom of religion?

To most of us, this is the most vital of all. On this point our Constitution says: “Congress shall make no law respecting the establishment of religion or prohibiting the free exercise thereof.”

What does the UN Covenant say? “Freedom to manifest one’s religion shall be subject only to such limitations as are necessary to protect public safety, order, health, morals or the fundamental rights and freedoms of others.”

The question which all Freedom-loving Americans must ask is: Who is to judge whether or not our religion and the way we worship will endanger somebody’s “health and morals?”

The answer is terrifying indeed. Even a brief analysis of the UN Covenants and our own Constitution shows that we cannot live under both at the same time, because they are not in agreement — pious, high-sounding words to the contrary.

If we were to live under the terms of the United Nations, we would have to surrender the sovereignty of the United States. Once that is surrendered, we who love Freedom will have no constitutional safeguards. Neither would any part of the free world.

Remember, the Charter of the United Nations does not recognize as unalienable the freedoms guaranteed by our Constitution. It purports to grant these rights. What government can grant, it can also take away.

Americans who say they stand for both the United Nations Charter and the United States Constitution, are not familiar with the provisions of these two documents, or they are fooling themselves, or they were trying to fool somebody else.

The UN Charter and the U.S. Constitution are mutually exclusive. In studying the UN Charter, it is important to look beyond the appealing slogans; it is absolutely vital that we know what is meant by “human rights”, “equality”, “social progress” and “freedoms”. And we must analyze carefully the UN’s basic aim of establishing international peace and security in the common interest.

No one will deny that a situation of international peace and security would be ideal. It was toward this end, and with good faith, that America ratified the UN Charter shortly after World War II–without too close an examination of how this was to be accomplished.

Much depends on how such a situation would be brought about, and after that, on how security would be maintained. We need to know whether the methods used would secure Freedom or bondage. We need to understand the difference in the communist concept of “peace” and “security” and our own meaning of the words.

The main principles of the UN Charter appear, on the surface, to be “equal rights” and “fundamental freedoms”. These phrases dominate the preamble and the first two articles of the Charter.

However, close examination shows that these “principles” are not actually bases for action. They are simply to be “respected” to whatever extent is possible, while other and somewhat different principles are applied.

In Article 1, Item 2, the Charter states this as a UN purpose: “To develop friendly relations among nations based on respect for the principle of equal rights and self-determination of peoples, and to take other appropriate measures to strengthen universal peace.”

In America, equal rights have been recognized as a premise of Freedom, not merely a “principle” to be accorded respect when it is convenient to do so.

An unalienable right of man is the right to own private property, but there is no recognition of this right in the UN Charter.

Furthermore, an effort to make property rights a part of the UN Declaration of Human Rights was defeated in the United Nations in 1960. The UN Resolution on Nationalization, adopted in 1952, does not call for prompt and full compensation for nationalization of property and resources.

If property rights were embodied in the UN Charter, then no Marxist could subscribe to it. Karl Marx said, “In all movements, bring to the front, as the leading question in every case, the property question.”

Thus, while communists make the property question foremost in trying to destroy Freedom, patriots must regard it as foremost in trying to save Freedom.

In studying the UN Charter, special attention should be given to what it says about “international peace and security.” This is a phrase we find very frequently in communist propaganda.

The communist conspiracy intends to establish its brand of “international peace and security” in a world dominated by communists.

The methods they use include subversion, agitation and armed force. What methods are open to the UN organization?

The Charter describes several measures which may be taken by the Security Council “to maintain or restore international peace and security” and what contributions to these measures the member nations are expected to make.

The Charter adds that if the Security Council should consider these measures insufficient, “it may take such action by air, sea, or land forces as may be necessary to maintain or restore international peace and security.”

In other words, the UN intends to establish its brand of international peace and security by any means, including armed force. That is what the dictatorships have always advocated. The communists practice their technique, according to the tenets of dialectical materialism. The UN technique is practiced according to the tenets of what might be called dialectical internationalism.

Neither suits Freedom-loving Americans. Our technique for seeking peace should be practiced according to the principles of Freedom and unalienable rights guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution and granted by the Creator.

There are many more Americans who are questioning the motives of the United Nations Charter. And there are many more Americans who have reached the age in life where the future of our country has little meaning to them personally; but they are concerned for their grandchildren and their great-grandchildren.

They want to leave them the heritage they received from their forefathers. They know that, despite those who argue that the United Nations is our “last hope for peace”, a responsible, sovereign and strong United States is the only defense of Freedom in the world.

United States (Democratic) Senator Frank Lausche (who served as an elected senator from Ohio between the years 1957 to 1969) offers one more example of why many people view the United Nations with increasing skepticism:

“UNESCO, an official appendage of the UN, makes the following remarkable statement in one of its publications (The United Nations Education, Science and Cultural Organization publication No. 356): ‘As long as a child breathes poisoned air of nationalism, education in world mindedness can only produce rather precarious results. It is frequently the family that infects the child with extreme nationalism. The school should use means to combat family attitudes that favor Jingoism. We shall presently recognize in nationalism the major obstacle to development of world peace.’

“It would seem, then,” said Senator Lausche, “that the ‘ideal world’ as envisioned by the UN functionaries may be brought into being at the expense of the family, and influences teaching a child to love his country. All of which may persuade fewer people to love the UN.

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Agenda 21: So-Called ‘Compromise’ with the Enemy is Idiotic

by Jane Gaffin

A version of this article ran in the March 21, 2001 Whitehorse Star under the banner Compromise is the Way to Failure.

So, what has been learned in those 13 years? That it is simply idiotic for Mr. and Ms. Good Guy to continue engaging in a so-called ‘compromise’ with the enemy.

The crux of all land issues and border disputes these days flow from bending over to the United Nations Agenda 21 — the blueprint for how the world will turn and slaves will behave in the 21st Century.

In other words, it is about an anti-constitutional, totalitarian New World Order society in which citizens are being denied property rights and the rule of law as is recognized to be the firmly-planted cornerstone of any democratic country.

It really is a quarter past midnight, time to forget about trying to negotiate energy-sucking, time-consuming concessions. It is high time for all sovereign nations that respect life, liberty and freedom to dismantle the corrupt international organization and get back to looking after business on respective home turfs.

From hereon, political wannabes must publicly demonstrate their sincere intentions to work toward annihilation of the U.N. along with the promise of returning taxpayers’ stolen money to homebase where it can be applied to less-wasteful causes. Candidates refusing the terms must be shown the egress.

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Individual landowners are feeling queasy these days.

They see the legal secure tenure to their privately-owned property weakening while the government arbitrarily extinguishes land titles through a constant stream of illegal and unconstitutional forfeiture and “civil remedy” laws. A bell-ringing example of land expropriation going on in Canada is explained by Alberta lawyer Keith Wilson in this 57 minute video: Property Rights in Alberta

Additionally, people are finding public lands sealed off to commercial ventures such as agriculture, mining, farming, ranching, logging, trapping and big-game outfitting.

Land-users who want to go off for a cross-country ski or a Sunday hike and picnic are learning that it’s harder to find wilderness areas open to lawful public use.

The easiest targets against which the green acolytes hurled their rhetorical claptrap are the recreationalists who have been demonized for their want of wide-open spaces to run and race snowmachines, all-terrain vehicles and four-wheel-drive units.

This land-grab scam has been on the drawing board for nearly 40 years but became astonishingly apparent when the environmental jihad hit its stride in the mid-1980s and the public has been losing ground since then.

The campaign has steadily grown worse because ordinary citizens are not educated or mentally equipped to deal with the United Nations Big Green Machine.

It’s a rarity to come across a person who has heard about Agenda 21, a land scheme cooked up by the United Nations whose mission is a patient chipping away until North American property owners are relegated to the endangered species list and the middle class is crushed.

No headway has been made in thwarting the expropriation measures in the 13 years since Norm Lenhart tried educating his fellow fresh-air buffs and other groups and individuals on where they had failed to combat land issues and what has to be done to fix the wrongs.

Of all the mistakes made in the past when dealing with the environmentalists, “compromise” was the greatest, emphasized the columnist in Off Road magazine back in March 2001.

His reposted article, “The Art of War Applied”, was directed at groups who could answer affirmatively to the question: “Having trouble with environmentalists?”

Taking a look at land closures around both Canada and America is a testament that “compromise” has resulted in the loss of millions of acres of once “public” land.

These are public lands which belonged at one time to all the public that have been sealed off from public use and been economically cleansed.

“On the heels of the so-named ‘extraction industry’, the outdoor recreation community comes in a close second as the target for unrelenting propaganda campaigns by the greens,” Lenhart added. “We are repeatedly portrayed as destructive, knuckle-dragging rednecks with sub-20 IQs, and ‘no compassion for nature, no sense of environmental justice’ ”.

The federal governments in both the U.S. and Canada have bent to pressures from professional environmentalists whose agenda runs counter to the most basic thought, beliefs and aspirations of a civilized and free society, he said.

The source of the government’s authority to close off public land should be by “the consent of the governed”. And the citizens did not give their respective governments’ mandates to take away public land that belongs to the public.

Lenhart’s arithmetic didn’t lie.

“When one begins with 4/4ths, and compromises half, he has a half left. The greens return a time later fighting for the other half. We agree to compromise again, and feel good knowing we have retained a quarter of what we once had,” he noted.

The process continues until the whole 4/4ths are designated as a “wilderness area”. Once it is designated as a “wilderness area” rather than just being “a wilderness area”, the area suddenly becomes off-limits for public use.

“Sadly, many of us are still caught in the throes of denial that war has been declared on us. Sadly, we have been shamed – nay, scared – into compromise by green propaganda.”

People also get hung up on shop-worn ideas like balance, negotiations and process, he continued. Hence, they end up wishing they could gracefully wiggle out of those signed initiatives, agreements and strategies.

But they don’t know how to undo what they did. “Nice guys” don’t renege on deals. They just finish last,” he said.

“In our fear of being portrayed as ‘the bad guy’, we have simply rolled over in a high number of situations where we should have held firm, fighting tooth and nail,” he stressed.

Lenhart challenged anybody to show him just one instance where compromise with any green group resulted in a gain for anyone except the green groups.

Lenhart views the idea of compromise with the greens as having a lot in common with the leftists’ beliefs that the definition of “bipartisanship” is that the right must give into the left. “Likewise, ‘compromise’ to a green means that an outdoor enthusiast must give into their demands.”

Lenhart was adamant about wholly abandoning the idea of making progress through compromise – compromising land, compromising individual rights and freedoms, compromising life and livelihood.

“(Compromise) has never gained us any land, only lost it. It has never meant victory, only defeat. We have lost both land and freedom.”

To add to Lenhart’s thought that the greens outshine their opponents when it comes to “knowing the enemy”, the guilt-ridden opponents have basically resorted to useless spluttering and grumbling among themselves but never developed any strategic plans.

Time after time, they have been stomped on the battlefield.

The second U.S. President John Adams believed that people could never preserve their rights and freedoms unless they first have a general knowledge of what they are trying to protect.

Then, they must know how to fight a war and win it – not through violence, but behind the scenes with strategy, careful planning and intrigue.

Sun Tzu’s The Art of War, written 2,000 years ago by a Chinese general, has served to teach beyond the limits of traditional warfare, advised Lenhart. The “how-to-Bible of the business” is used in corporate boardrooms, political campaigns and, yes, by the green groups as a guide for fulfilling their agenda.

Throughout many years of fighting, groups engaged in land-use battles have repeatedly set themselves up for failure, he said. “Outside the ultimate goal of victory, there has never been a cohesive, coordinated battle plan to bring the goal to fruition.”

A lot of this happens because of a house divided. Each organization must be congealed into an army that acts with one voice and one purpose before coming together as a coalition. It, too, must act with one voice and one purpose.

The Art of War leaves no room for ego. Those out to promote themselves serve only to hinder progress of the whole. Divisiveness plays right into the hands of the enemy.

“If you’re looking to make a name for yourself, look elsewhere,” he suggested. “Our own stubborn reluctance to come together has been one of the greatest weapons that the greens have. It has been used against us with devastating effectiveness.”

He’s right, of course. There is no glue to hold coalitions together. They are weakened with internal politics and fighting their allies rather than the enemy.

Professional soldiers like Norm Lenhart and Sun Tzu never count on their opponents making mistakes. They count on outwitting them. The Art of War outlines circumstances in which victory can be predicted.

He who knows when he can fight and when he cannot will be victorious; he who understands how to use both large and small forces will be victorious; he whose ranks are united in purpose will be victorious.

Also victorious will be he who is prudent and lies in wait for an enemy who is not prudent. He whose generals are able and not interfered with by the sovereign will be victorious, too.

It is of prime importance when fighting land-use battles to develop a concrete set of goals and guidelines to work with and fight from a pro-active stance, warned Lenhart.

“We’re often caught with our pants down and again forced into a position of ‘re-action’ rather than ‘action’, which places us at a significant disadvantage.”

People were alarmed when they finally became aware of the corrupt scheme of governments starting to do regulatory takings of privately-owned property and banning public lands from public use, whether for recreational purposes or for cattle watering and grazing.

And the public is paying for its own demise.

The 192 member states comprising the United Nations tax people without their knowledge or permission. The money is laundered through the central office of the respective federal governments. Then the money funnels down through the system into the coffers of well over 20,000 worldwide NGOs (non-government organizations) and goes to pay the freight bills for the greensters who go forth to seize your real estate.

In February 2011, Canada redefined the term “real estate”. It no longer means “house and lot” or a major “investment”. The government reassigned value as a “consumer item”, like a car or a carrot. This renders the confiscation process less complicated for the government than when it is seizing real property which is suppose to be protected by such inconveniences as legal security of tenure and due process of law.

It took people a long time to learn that this war against property is not about the official green partyline of “Saving the Planet”.

This war on property is about “Saving Civilization” from the Marxists who started this war, pitting one group against another, and the rest of us have no choice but to end it before we are all destroyed. If landowners lose this war, they lose everything and are doomed to spend the rest of their days existing in abject poverty under the looming Marxist UN flag of a One World (Dis)Order.

There is no room for Mr. and Ms. Nice Guy” compromises with the enemy. It is idiotic. Compromise is simply a myth that has only led to failure.

It is high time to send out troops to hijack the apparat of the United Nations and wipe its slate clean of illegal international laws, treaties, policies, accords, pograms, organizations, thievery – and especially Agenda 21 – that are threatening individual property rights, the cornerstone of any democracy, plus endangering every nations’ sovereignty under so-called “free trade” agreements.

It is high time to curtail the corruption that has oozed down through the cracks of all political and bureaucratic tiers into every corner of every community in North America and Western Europe.

Basically, it is high time that Canada, the United States and all Western European and Commonwealth countries withdraw their financial support from the United Nations, a monstrous institution that outlived its uselessness long ago.

*******

 

Gerald H. Priest: His Life and Crime Against a ‘Company of Fools’

by Jane Gaffin

An ingeniously-plotted high-grade silver ore heist in the Yukon Territory has intrigued mining people, crime aficionados, lawyers, investigators, writers and others since a lengthy 1963 trial was staged in that northern, backwater, federally-controlled jurisdiction that most Canadians still can’t find on a map — a place the author of A Rock Fell on the Moon assesses as having milked the 1898 Klondike Gold Rush history “like a menopausal cow”.

It was a masterfully-crafted madcap scheme against what was once one of the richest silver camps in the world. The architects were two highly-intelligent co-conspirators who proved, however, there is honour among thieves.

Gerald Henry Priest, along with Anthony “Poncho” Bobcik, a big, jovial Czech, refused to tattle on a third party, a mine captain, believed instrumental in pulling off the ruse but his deeds went unproven.

Adding to the further frustration of baffled police investigators, United Keno Hill Mines (UKHM) workers remained mum on all counts, too. In solidarity, they refused to squeal on one of their own.

The 671 twill sacks full of high-grade ore were supposedly hand-mined legally by the two men from their Moon mineral claims and salted with a few allowable precipitates rejected from the mill.

If, on the other hand, the pair actually committed criminal sin, then the workers’ admiration escalated a thousandfold in a “good for them” attitude.

A large percentage of workers held a direct contempt for the mining company and maybe an indirect disdain for the Toronto-based, multi-national parent corporation, Falconbridge Nickel Ltd.

Much of this scorn would not have metastasized into such hostility except for the dictatorial UKHM general manager whose ghastly managerial practices were unprecedented. He didn’t seem to like the company he managed and definitely wasn’t a people-person. Maybe, as an inept manger, he should have been held indirectly responsible for causing the ruckus and did eventually receive his comeuppance in something akin to a storybook theme of “good trumps evil”.

Until Harbour Publishing released daughter Alicia Priest’s book A Rock Fell on the Moon: Dad and the Great Yukon Silver Ore Heist (peek inside at Kindle’s sample chapters) on the 2014 Christmas list, nobody except family members and maybe a few close friends had an insight into what made Gerald Henry Priest tick.

Some people viewed United Keno Hill Mines’ chief assayer as a friend; others saw him as moody and mercurial; Judge John Parker, responsible for sentencing, noted Priest to be “a strange bird” and condemned him for harbouring a grudge against society.

None got it quite right.

Priest had it all. Yet like Robert Service’s poem The Men Who Don’t Fit In”, which suits Priest to a T, he sadly wouldn’t admit his mistakes until he was robbed by that sneaky devil called time. His self-analysis came too late to pick up the fractured pieces and make amends.

He was a clever man. He had a flair for writing, could remember lyrics to tunes, accompanying himself on a guitar, and recite Robert Service poems by heart, the reason the author has opened each of 20 chapters plus the epilogue with appropriate lines lifted from a variety of the bard’s verses.

He was a great storyteller, spinning wild fables into plausible tales that turned skeptics into believers. He and his geologist cronies convinced a court in Round One that “in geology, anything is possible”.

How could six jurors, who wouldn’t have known a sulphide from the city limits, counter the experts? Maybe a rock really did fall on his Moon mining claims millions of years ago, and Priest simply took advantage of mining Mother Nature’s gift.

As the story unfolds, the reader constantly vacillates between his guilt or innocence.

Priest and his family lived in a company-owned Panabode house, reserved for Elsa’s upper echelon. Inside, the comfortable, cozy, varnished, log-style home was rich with music, books, a cat and much-loved Belgian shepherd, Caesar.

His home was his castle where he didn’t have to exert effort to boil a kettle or wash a sock. He had a well-paying job; a beautiful, affectionate wife; and two daughters, Vona and Alicia, born 360 days apart, who revered him as only little girls can.

Or, as the author inquires, did he perhaps see things differently? “Four female dependents, an ailing wife [heart problems] who couldn’t give him the son he deserved; a religiously fanatical mother-in-law, a tedious dead-end job for a company of fools and two daughters who revered him as only little girls can?”

Most people would want to keep their family skeletons stuffed permanently inside a locked closet, not to be whispered about ever. This memoir cum thriller doesn’t masquerade the warts and blemishes but uninhibitedly rattles the bones in an effort to dig out the truth.

It was way past time for half-truths and speculations written by others to be set aside and for the author to tackle the prickly job of fully disclosing her father’s good points, which is why she loved him, as well as his misdeeds, for which she couldn’t forgive him.

His frank, candid, resilient, loving daughter, Alicia, was the only person who could pull off the thorny assignment properly, coupled with invaluable assistance from her own “rock”, husband Ben Parfitt, a writer in his own rights.

As though Papa’s story doesn’t provide enough surprises when turning every corner, the reader is bolted over with an unexpected double dose of intense family history from the maternal side of the equation.

As a girl, Maria, or Omi as her loving granddaughters addressed her, had fallen from riches to rags, having begun life in a wealthy, Russian land-owning family who lost everything, including themselves, to revolution and anarchy.

With her birth family and her only living son, Peter, imprisoned somewhere in the Gulag, she suffered a lifelong survivor complex. While guilt was somewhat assuaged by strong Mennonite convictions, in her mind she was a sinner. “In the terror time, I did what I did to stay alive,” she was quoted as saying.

God only knows what sins she committed to survive and it’s best not to probe. Many Ukrainians refrained from discussing this awful past, although some did loosen their aging tongues so the next generation would have an inkling about Holodomor.

Josef Stalin’s man-made famine exterminated unknown millions through deliberate starvation in the 1930s. When the Soviet’s army confiscated the crops, not leaving a grain, much less a percentage of the harvest for the villagers’ winter food supply, residents resorted to eating cats, dogs, exhumed horses, leaves from trees, then each other.

Survivors were fortunate if they came through the terror with their memories blocked and sanity in tact.

An excerpt from a eulogy Alicia wrote in the Globe and Mail when her mother, who survived two husbands, died in 2011 hints at Helen’s tough-fiber: “If life is an obstacle course, Helen Young was a gazelle. Spirited, elegant and beautiful, she had a fragility and charm that masked her determination to clear one hurdle after another.”

Lolya, or Helen, was born November 24, 1924, in what was at the time southern Russia and is now the Ukraine. She was the second child and only daughter of Maria Reger and Abraham Friesen. Her younger brother Alexander died of diphtheria at 18 months.

Her family moved away from their large extended Mennonite clan in the Ukraine to Ebental, a small village in the foothills of the Caucasus Mountains. As a Mennonite, her mother tongue and heritage were German, the enemy of Stalin’s USSR, where their religious freedom was no longer tolerated.

In 1930, Helen’s mother, Maria, learned that her parents, sisters and brothers had been loaded in cattle cars and shipped to Siberia, two children dying along the way. The Soviet regime became their immediate enemy. Under a psychopathic Stalin, the Caucasus region was no safer than the Ukraine had been.

Three years later, Helen’s father collapsed and died at age 35, having learned his name was on Stalin’s personal list of who would live or die after rounded up and brought before his secret police for interrogation.

Within two years, Helen’s mother married another Mennonite, Heinrich Werle, a university-trained agronomist responsible for ensuring the late August harvest of the area’s wheat crop. The “progressive” state forbade the use of horses which were “replaced” with non-existent combines.

Caught in a life-and-death conundrum, Werle ordered farmers to hitch up the horses and bring in the harvest. The act was truly part of the Harvest of Sorrow. The crop secured, Werle was banished to a northeastern hard labour camp.

In 1940, Helen, of high school age, and her mother, Maria, moved to still a larger town, Stepnoye.

Helen’s older brother Peter, now 17, had stayed behind in Ebental to care for the family’s small house and few animals. The following year, he too was arrested and instantly disappeared to the Gulag, along with other relatives who were assumed to have all perished in that inhumane, Stalin-devised hellhole.

In 1941, the Nazis marched into the Caucasus. Due to their common language and common hatred, Maria saw them as liberators. When the Russian army launched its massive counter offensives in the winter of 1943-44, Helen and Maria were forced to escape by foot, horse-drawn cart and cattle car along with the Germans.

Nineteen-year-old Helen and her mother arrived in German-occupied Poland, ultimately making their way to Germany where they were greeted with mass terror as buildings were reduced to rubble by Allied bombs. Helen secured a respected job as a Russian-German translator for Kommission 28, a division of the German Reich.

In the fall of 1948, a Canadian Mennonite family put up $500 to sponsor the hard-working mother-daughter duo to resettle in Matsqui, British Columbia, where Abraham and Helene Rempel, who remained life-long friends, gave them a home and a community. After paying off their ship and train fares labouring in the fields, they were free to venture out on their own.

After crossing two continents and the Atlantic Ocean, Helen felt rejuvenated. What better way to cement her new self to her new nation where she finally felt safe than to marry a real Canadian?

Before marrying Gerald Priest, she had turned down a United Nations collection of suitors: a Russian, Pole, Italian, three Germans and an American as well as a dedicated Mennonite whose plans to work overseas as a missionary was not for her.

Neither was the Yukon’s jerkwater mining town of Elsa, where she sparkled like a jewel in a junkheap. “A cardinal in a town of sparrows”, as the author describes her exotic mother who loved the city life that suffocated her bush-minded husband.

She stitched her own chic wardrobe with help from a nimble-fingered mother and dressed the two girls in matching ensembles. She never owned a pair of jeans in this mining town of boardwalks, bladed lanes and unpaved roads, covered in either snow, ice, mud, dust, dirt or gravel, depending on the season.

I didn’t want A Rock Fell on the Moon to end. The writing style is crisp, fast-flowing and humourous, the sentences often loaded with fresh, witty similes and metaphors.

With pages nearly exhausted, I didn’t believe space remained to run headlong into any more jolting surprises around the next corner. While only a fool tries to out-judge a judge, the reader should never try to outguess how Alicia Priest would choose to present her true “whodunit”.

At this point, Gerald Priest didn’t have two plugged silver pesos to jangle together in his jean pocket. But he had chutzpah.

His blood boiled every time he thought about American Smelting and Refining Company (ASARCO) in Helena, Montana, smelting his shipment of ore and sending the fat cheque for $125,322.17 to United Keno Hill Mines before the courts had determined who owned the ore and where the ore had originated.

This irrepressible guy took another jab at justice. His family, unravelling at the seams, was oblivious to his international escapades in which he convinced his new Stateside lawyer to take his civil case on contingency.

Priest provided a plausible explanation to Nelson Christensen, a young lawyer working for a large, prestigious Seattle firm. He had delivered a shipment of raw ore to ASARCO in June, 1963, he explained, then two years later he had been convicted of theft. Since the worth of the ore skyrocketed in Priest’s mind with each retelling, he pegged the value of ore this time at $200,000.

Long before he had been found guilty, he said, the smelter processed the disputed ore and cut UKHM a big cheque. “That’s violation of the contract I had with ASARCO, isn’t it?” Priest asked of Christensen.

“It was an audacious gambit but one that Dad’s new lawyer in Seattle felt was worth pursuing,” writes the author.

In 1967, notice was served on ASARCO that Gerald H. Priest was suing the smelter for breach of contract. Seattle lawyer Christensen argued that the smelter had breached the terms of the contract prior to Priest’s criminal conviction by smelting the ore before Canadian courts issued any ruling.

The filing of the claim against ASARCO set off a nuclear explosion at UKHM. Before ASARCO had paid UKHM, the smelter had required the company to agree that if Priest and/or his partner, Anthony Bobcik, or Bobcik’s company, Alpine Gold and Silver, or anybody else came out of the woodwork to recover funds from the smelter, UKHM would have to reimburse the smelter.

That problem was between the mining company and the smelter and had nothing to do with Priest, who sat back smirking. Revenge is sweet, even when served up cold.

If Priest earned nothing else from his current gamble for a cash settlement, he at least had the satisfaction of watching the Big Boys squirming.

This surprise aftermath that the author unloads at the eleventh hour is a long-obscured segment in the saga of the Moon claims. And, despite what Priest did, the reader wants to applaud this scenario that holds a bit of ironic twist against the Goliathan companies UKHM, ASARCO as well as the judiciary in Canada, who, as political bedfellows, had been beating up on a poor little David.

In fact, earlier in chronological events, the Yukon judiciary’s face turned red with rage — or more to the point, Judge Parker’s — due to a couple of other overlooked glitches: “It’s not what you know, but who you know” that counts and “Never underestimate the power of a woman” who just might be working on the “outside” in favour of securing the release of her husband who’s been helplessly incarcerated like a fly in a jar on the “inside”.

The author’s interesting website can be visited at www.aliciapriest.com where more can be learned about this courageous woman’s date with her “ultimate deadline”, ALS, better known as Lou Gehrig’s disease.

A Glimpse at the Whitehorse Copperbelt: A Compilation

https://janegaffin.files.wordpress.com/2014/10/whitehorse-copperbelters.pdf

by Jane Gaffin

The Whitehorse Copperbelt and the companies that explored and mined the 17- to 18-mile-long crescent-shaped strip of ground west of the Yukon’s capital city have been noted for several unique features over the years.

First, Yukoners can claim fame to the existence of a rare mineral identified as valleriite, or vallerite, in their own backyard. The occurrence of the brassy-coloured sulphide mineral of iron and copper is so unusual as to be found only in about seven locations in the world. One of those places is the Whitehorse Copperbelt.

While locals can boast of the copperbelt hosting an anomalous mineral, it actually was not a welcome sight for metallurgists. Valleriite, graphitic in texture, played hell with ore-treatment techniques used in the milling process until the minor mineral mysteriously dissipated in the ore mined at depth.

Additionally, Whitehorse Copper Mines, a marginally-profitable company reconstituted from New Imperial Mines in 1972, had to be a trend-setter in its approach to keeping the purchase and maintenance costs of heavy underground machinery to a minimum.

The company, operating close to the bone on three-year ore reserves, instituted innovative applications for tackling cost problems while simultaneously looking at future diversification and expansion plans in an effort to keep 200 employees working when sufficient blocks of mineable ore reserves were depleted.

As mechanical parts became more scarce, and the waiting time for delivery of mine machinery lengthened, the adroit Whitehorse Copper employees put their minds together to instigate imaginative master plans.

General Manager Vic Jutronich liked to brag up his happy workforce rowing in the same direction as well as bringing special attention to a newfangled contraption created at the property. The hydrastatic Clark Mobile, an underground service vehicle, was a legacy of Clark Van Steinburg, the mechanical shop superintendent who invented and designed the brainchild.

Van Steinburg staunchly believed heavy equipment should never break down or wear out if well-maintained. He bought traded-in machinery, worked hard for more than 10,000 hours, that most other industrial complexes would shun as fatigued junk.

Not Van Steinburg, a mechanical wizard. Sharing his sentiments was a long-term steady staff of 26 mechanics, welders and machinists, like Jack Monet and John Millar, shop foreman Roy Watson, and drill doctors Jim Graham and Ray Osborne. They viewed the “worthless junk” as prizes.

The crew salvaged parts and pieces and built and rebuilt their own workhorses. On-site equipment designing and construction proved itself to be low-maintenance cost and outlasted some factory-built equipment.

Jim Graham, in charge of the drill shop where underground drills and pumps were repaired, and machinist Jack Monet put on their thinking caps and conjured up a money-saving suggestion that rewarded them with $1,700 each through the Suggestion Awards incentive program for an ingenious rock- breaker proposal.

The modifications saved the company $34,000 a year. The appreciative and economically-minded company granted 10 percent of what was saved within a calendar year to the employees who came up with the cost-saver.

If the employee’s idea went one step further and made money for the company, then the inventor received a certain percentage of those earnings. A money-reward system was a strong incentive for guys to keep their minds open and pencils sharp.

After rebuilding such mechanisms as diesel engines, power-shift transmissions and differentials, the mine could operate machinery such as 5-yard, front-end loader Scooptrams almost continuously without maintenance worries.

Van Steinburg and his converted-minded staff, in their contention that there’s a way to build heavy-equipment machinery that doesn’t break down, went about tenaciously fulfilling Van Steinburg’s theory in the completely-equipped, 15,000-square-foot workshop.

In the event that Whitehorse Copper exhausted known ore reserves within three years, manager Jutronich contended there was no reason for the Whitehorse Copper facility to crumble and perish. He promoted the structure as solidly established to shift gears and transform into a mine-related business. (He also promoted seeding the rich, mineral-laced tailings ponds for conversion into a community golf course.)

His far-reaching strategy was for the company to stay in business and keep jobs in the Yukon by concentrating on building and repairing mining equipment for other companies and farming out five-star underground miners to work in other locales.

For instance, engines could be rebuilt for Cantung (Canada Tungsten) on the Yukon-Northwest Territories border. It would preclude the inconvenience of the mine wasting extra time and expense sending key overhaul jobs to major cities. Those jobs could stay in the Yukon. He had a crackerjack staff capable of undertaking those specialty tasks.

And, for sure, Whitehorse Copper could contract out experienced crews to other underground operations. If Whitehorse Copper owner Hudson Bay Mining had a job at its MacMillan Pass Mactung (tungsten) deposit that would, for instance, cost $2 million, Whitehorse Copper’s personnel could be contracted for half the price, a proposal that maybe jolted Jutronich’s Hudson Bay boss.

Unless new reserves were found, though, ore reserves outlined to last Whitehorse Copper roughly three years were finite. That indisputable fact meant the mine would come to a screeching halt. The manager knew it and the 200 employees knew it. But did anybody else know it? Or care?

In view of the looming dilemma, Jutronich reflected on what the company should do. Just shut up shop and sell assets and pay shareholders back? Or diversify and expand? Jutronich knew what he wanted to do but he didn’t have the sympathetic ear of immediate superiors who may have rejected his ingenious ideas as borderline lunatic fringe.

Yet, at the relevant time, Bobo LaRocque, a veteran underground miner, was teaching underground mining classes for the Yukon government’s Vocational and Technical Training School at a replica site tunneled into rock on nearby Grey Mountain that tapered off into low hills like a plucked eyebrow. Over half the total 252 graduates trained by the jovial Frenchman became experienced miners employed throughout the Yukon and Canada.

Another unexpected phenomenon happened in 1976. The 1971 Mining Safety Ordinance for the Yukon that stated no female could work underground was amended by the Yukon Legislative Assembly. It was proclaimed as law by Commissioner James Smith to allow women to work underground in the territory.

None of the Yukon’s three underground mines of the day — United Keno Hill Mines at Elsa; Carmacks Coal, owned by Cyprus Anvil Mining for producing fuel for the drying of lead-zinc concentrates at Faro; and Whitehorse Copper Mines — anticipated a flood of female applicants for the hard-labor jobs.

Whitehorse Copper Mines, seven road miles south of town, had one enthusiast, mine expeditor Trudy Vanderburg. The woman who actually broke ground as the Yukon’s first — and only — female underground miner was Janeane MacGillivray.

The Yukon’s Mining Safety Ordinance was designed to protect women and children from unfair working conditions existing in mining operations. Since politicians felt those conditions no longer existed in the Yukon, the bill was passed to show no discrimination in the practice of hiring male and female personnel in the mines.

The original bill was based on an age-old superstition that had prevented women from even visiting an underground site based on miners’ beliefs they would bring a cave-in, fire, ore depletion or other calamity to the tunnel.

A Glimpse at the Whitehorse Copperbelt is a compilation of historic materials, newspaper articles, personal interviews and photographs covering a period from 1898, when the copper mines were discovered, to 1982 when Whitehorse Copper Mines closed due to inevitable ore exhaustion.

The 350-page document mentions 33 old Crown Grants. Important mining claims like the Pueblo are detailed and their owners profiled.

From William P. Grainger and John McIntyre, who met tragic deaths, the historical account moves on with the invaluable help of copperbelt aficionado Dick McKenna to more pioneers such as James Whitney, Katherine Ryan, H.E. Porter, Tommy Kerruish, Robert Lowe, Sam McGee, and Captain John Irving.

One major historic copperbelt event was the tragic Pueblo cave-in on March 21, 1917. Of the nine miners trapped, only three were rescued.

Well-known underground miner, Ed Andre, and his colleagues paid tribute to the permanently entombed men by listing their names on a bronze plaque they anchored to a granite boulder at the minesite. On September 18, 2001, 84 years after the fact, they staged a ceremony that finally gave the miners a dignified burial service.

In the long term, the Little Chief deposit proved to be the jewel in the copperbelt’s Crown where mining was forced to go underground into the deep ore.

Whitehorse Copper Mines’ predecessor, New Imperial Mines, had used the open-pit method to excavated its series of mines. General Manager Ross Kenway and Chief Geologist Bob Hilker presented their glowing reports to an annual meeting of the Canadian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy in Vancouver, April, 1968. Kenway discussed large-scale mining of small open pits in the Yukon while Hilker stuck to outlining the geology of the Little Chief ore deposit.

During New Imperial’s tenure on the copperbelt, Armand Arsenault provided much of the extensive diamond drilling contracts.

When New Imperial morphed into Whitehorse Copper, Tony Caron of E.Caron Diamond Drilling was the prominent fixture on the belt where Andy Hureau served as the long-term exploration geologist and Dave Tenney as chief geologist. Both were “carry overs” from New Imperial days.

Whitehorse Copperbelters Part VIII portrays personality sketches of Pete Versluce, Harry Versluce and Chuck Gibbons, the prospectors who optioned the Little Chief and other claims to the mining companies; Paul White, a land surveyor who helped locate some old turn-of-the-century Crown Grant staking posts for New Imperial brass; Bob Hilker, New Imperial’s chief geologist; Dave Tenney, Whitehorse Copper’s chief geologist; Andy Hureau, Whitehorse Copper’s exploration geologist; and veteran underground miners Erich Stoll and Ed Andre, author of Heroes of Darkness, a little book commemorating underground miners.

And, of course, the picture wouldn’t be complete without showing off the governments’ true colours. The muscle-flexing city diligently counter-opposed the miners by appealing to the feds to declare a staking moratorium. Ultimately, the territorial government persecuted and the city prosecuted prospector Rob Hamel over his copperbelt War Eagle property, nicknamed the “dump claims”.

And, then, came the upbeat reunion of more than 200 nostalgists who reunited in the summer of 1995 to bid their final adieus to what most attendees heralded as “the best place I ever worked; if Whitehorse Copper were still going, I’d probably still be working there”.

See the whole miscellany of stories at Whitehorse Copperbelters.

 

Dismantling Industrial Civilization is on the Agenda

 

by Jane Gaffin

From the 1976  forewarning files…

Over the years, the United Nations Agenda 21’s insidious, ever-expanding tentacles have reached out globally in every direction to surreptitiously encapsulate every facet of people’s lives while they weren’t paying attention.

Agenda 21 — which simply means a blueprint as to how a New World Order will dictate how society will live and behave in the 21st Century — didn’t get a serious toehold on its radical scheme until its 1992 environmental conference in Rio de Janeiro where the ultimate plan of action was concocted to take humanity backwards into another Dark Age.

To save planet earth from destruction meant the elimination of all human activity, plus, as a little sidebar, the pogrom called for the extinguishment of middle-class society and the extermination of at least three-quarters of the world population.

One of the initial steps to successful implementation was the dismantling of industrial civilization and, in Marxist fashion, relieving individuals and corporations of their right to own property — whether that be an expansive farm, a plot of land for a house, or mining claims — and the withdrawal of all leases and licenses to government-controlled lands for grazing cattle, big-game guiding, placer and hard rock mining, and any other private enterprises.

Below is a prophetic article, Who Gets the Blame? Hit by Strikes Yukon Economy Suffers, that appeared September 30, 1976 as the lead in the Toronto-based Northern Miner, the Bible of the worldwide mining industry. It demonstrates in spades the enormous international ramifications and ripple effect of how society suffers the backlash when governments and a few power-hungry individuals start toying with industrial civilization “for fun”.

At the relevant time, the Yukon was blindsided with a severe blow said to be a protest to the Anti-Inflation Board.

The Anti-Inflation Act was a contentious parliamentary act passed in 1975 by Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau’s Liberal government in Ottawa supposedly as a measure to slow down inflation that was blamed on an out-of-control increase in commodity prices and wages government and companies were paying to employees.

The unpopular law was met with an angry counterblast from virtually every sector of society. The populace is just now beginning to comprehend what is really in store for the future.

No ordinary person could fathom what evilness invisible global elitists were plotting behind closed doors 38 years ago. By now, there is no doubt. And the draconian fallout from Agenda 21 is not going to be pretty as it continues coiling conspiratorially around us everyday like a big sneaky snake stalking its unsuspecting prey.

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What a mess!

Worried Yukoners tough-sledded through the summer when labor disputes crippled the $228 million mining industry, the Yukon’s No. 1 support.

Now the 22,000 residents face an uncertain winter under guidance of a new commissioner, an anemic economy dropping faster than the mercury in the thermometer at $100,000 per day, and the provincehood issue crescendoing.

Things got hot in the summer. Simultaneously, United Steelworkers (USW) closed three of the Yukon’s four operating mines, plus the Cassiar Asbestos mine in Northern British Columbia, near the Yukon border.

Labor disputes disrupted operations at Whitehorse Copper, United Keno Hill Mines (UKHM) at Elsa, and Cyprus Anvil Mining at Faro.

As temperatures dipped into September, United Keno finally reached a settlement with the union. The miners are getting back to work and production is up to 40 per cent of normal, but the agreement has yet to be ratified by the Anti-Inflation Board. At Cyprus Anvil, no thaw is in sight and the mine is still shut down, while Whitehorse Copper workers are back on the job earning a base hourly wage of $6.10.

The only mine uninterrupted by labor problems was Clinton Creek Mine, northwest of Dawson City, eight miles from the Alaska border.

The Clinton employees are Canadian Mine Workers, their negotiations concerned with severance pay and move-out allowances.

Owned by Cassiar Asbestos, Clinton has been exhausted of commercial-grade fibres, and a permanent closure is expected early next year.

In mid-September, the Cassiar subsidiary of Territorial Supply, an International Harvester franchise in Whitehorse, closed after 25 years of service. The Transport Division is continuing to haul fibre from Clinton to railhead at Whitehorse.

THE COMPLEX ISSUE

The Cyprus Anvil lead-zinc mine, the Yukon’s largest mine, is directly responsible for half the Yukon’s economy. When the 10,000-ton-per-day operation is immobilized, two-thirds of the territory is paralyzed.

Major strikes have erupted there three times this year, and helped start the economy on its roller-coaster path nine months ago.

In late July, the 400 United Steelworkers members entered their latest strike, ostensibly a protest against the Anti-Inflation Board’s substantial roll back in their wage and benefit contract from 36 to a 9 per cent increase in the first year.

The union insisted it wasn’t a strike against the company, therefore Cyprus Anvil tried to avert the work stoppage by offering to join the union in an organized approach to the Anti-Inflation Board about the revision decision.

A local news analyst, Don Sawatsky, reported an ebullient spirit in Faro, with campers packed before the union opted to strike. He said they just didn’t realize the seriousness of that decision.

The new contract, retroactive to October of last year, was for an hourly base rate of $7.

Not only did the strike decision drastically hamper the Yukon, but Faro activities can be felt many places. Skagway, Alaska is the port-of-call where ships load ore concentrates destined to customers in Japan and European countries.

While 1,500 residents from the Yukon’s second-largest community are fishing, a lot of people are sitting around in wide-eyed amazement wondering where the concentrates went.

Ironically, Faro, constructed in 1969, hasn’t been inked onto many maps. But the little town sure packs a wallop.

Presently, Yukoners have lost track of who’s mad at whom, what the strike’s all about. This week the Canadian Labor Relations Board handed down its decision that a new agreement would have to be negotiated meeting the requirements of the Anti-Inflation Act. Thus, the obscure and complex issues are still unresolved.

Cyprus Anvil is the biggest customer for the Northern Canada Power Commission (NCPC). With the mine down, NCPC reported a loss of $200 thousand a month. The federally-owned utility company by an Act of Parliament can’t operate in the red, and requires consumers to pick up any deficits.

Yukoners fear they’re cradling another price hike in their palms. Within the last year, NCPC has raised wholesale power rates by 80 per cent to defray a $30 million override for the new 30-megawatt Aishihik power project, 80 miles northwest of Whitehorse.

Since the rate-increase protest launched by Yukoners in January, James Smith has stepped down from his 10-year service as Commissioner and turned full attention to chairmanship of NCPC.

Mr. Smith said that he’s keeping the federal people apprised of the current situation in the north, and is hopeful of a realistic solution to the problem.

He doesn’t want the federal government coming back to the Yukon this time with an excuse of “not knowing what was happening.”

The Yukon could sell stock in its northern winters. The price always promises to double. Gas pumps glared with the third petroleum increase within 13 months, gas retailing for $1.05 a gallon in Whitehorse. Outlying areas are looking at 50 cents tacked onto that. Heating fuels went as high as 64.2 cents a gallon.

It’s like gold,” a Gulf wholesale representative said, “except going the opposite direction!

The economic pressures are high, and many people from the work force of 10,000 envisage a jobless winter. Some, not taking any chances, planted “For Sale” signs in their front lawns. Even school enrollment was down by nearly 200.

And marginal-profit companies are getting more uptight by the minute about the constant increases in overhead, and wages being pushed to the hilt. They’re waiting for the inevitable — the twain to meet and drive small businesses into oblivion.

The $20 million mineral exploration industry was quiet this field season. Inactivity was blamed partially on crews having to curtail work at minesites that were embroiled in labor disputes. Another speculation for the slow-down is that large companies have been given encouragements to return to British Columbia under the Social Credit government, and companies want to search for minerals where they get the most for their shopping dollars.

This field season consisted mainly of regional follow-ups, with relatively few grassroots projects initiated in the Yukon. And helicopter operators, diamond drillers and expediters were all feeling the pinch. One helicopter pilot reported a mere 10 revenue hours flown by June 21. Normally, by that time, the exploration people would be queued up for aircraft service.

The largest Yukon transportation firm had only a skeleton fleet of diesels trickling the gravel network of roads. White Pass and Yukon Route laid off 90 per cent of the 133 drivers, and a total lay off of 287 employees.

Five men were rehired to service at Whitehorse Copper and Cassiar Asbestos when the two mines returned to work in late summer; however, it’s expected to take time to regain full mining operations.

White Pass ship and train schedules slackened. Ships sail the west coast from Vancouver to Skagway, Alaska with commodities destined the 110-miles farther to Whitehorse by White Pass narrow-gauge rail.

The Chamber of Commerce has been beating the bushes for answers to the economic strife. Local entrepreneurs reported a 15 per cent reduction in business, and blamed the decrease in their profits on the labor situation in the mining industry.

However, tourism was also down considerably this summer.

The Chamber president said, “We’re at a loss as to what to do. It’s a delicate situation. Hopefully, the unions and managements can get started on some meaningful dialogue.”

It’s virtually impossible to estimate accurately a figure of revenue loss in the territory, especially through taxes lost in unpaid wages and the congealment of cash flow to the retail market. However, one of the largest sources of income to the territory is through fuel taxes. A half million has been lost from the trucks that are being mothballed and aren’t bringing in the 16 cents per gallon road tax.

Regardless of when industry resumes full-speed-ahead productivity, it’s predicted to take two years to wash away the stickiness after being in the jam jar.

Merv Miller said, “Even when the economy rolls again, there’ll be a long-term impact for both government and industry.” The assistant commissioner said he thinks labor and management must reach the common denominator goal — earning money. But returning to work still squabbling with each other won’t solve anything, he remarked.

“Mines shouldn’t take all the blame,” Mr. Miller continued. “The economy peaked in July last year and has been on a plateau since that time.”

He said, “There’s little we can do now, except wait.

The territorial government is waiting to the tune of $150 thousand per month direct revenue losses.

Dr. Jack Hibbard, a member of the Yukon’s legislative assembly (MLA), said, “The Yukon can’t withstand the pressure of the work stoppage any longer. If legislation is the route, let’s take it.

But he’s apprehensive that legislation will further alienate labor, management and the Anti-Inflation Board.

He suggested that Commissioner Art Pearson make representation to the federal government, unions and mine managements. The Commissioner will be sitting in on negotiations as a non-partisan observer to obtain original information, instead of the second-hand knowledge that has been prevalent in the past.

Dr. Pearson was appointed Commissioner by the Liberal government and succeeded James Smith in July.

UNION CONTEST

Faro union members said they’d quit if forced back to work by legislation, and threatened that the Yukon wouldn’t be able to hire tradesmen under the current rates.

Cassiar’s getting more an hour than we are,” complained one United Steelworker member at Faro. Cassiar went back to work with a base wage of $7.30 an hour.

In March, at a United Steelworkers mining conference in Whitehorse, a personal contest developed between two local presidents.

Bob Yorke and Stu McCall, the meeting chairman, had a succinct discussion over which union local would get the highest contract in the shortest negotiating time.

Mr. Yorke, USW local president at Cassiar, said, “Cassiar’s not worried about matching Faro. We’re going to do it in less than nine months. We’ll do it in two months.”

He asked that all unions stick together to ensure good contracts for all mines.

At Faro for six years, Mr. McCall, who’s recently resigned as local president, turns the Yukon’s economy on and off like a faucet. The Englishman, also an elected member of the Yukon’s legislative assembly, was a machinist in the paper trade before coming to Canada.

“I don’t like mining,” he said. His plans are to stay until the mine’s finished to be sure that development is done properly.

“The mining industry is immature,” he commented. “It takes risks, gambles, and is financially greedy. That makes it difficult to fight inflation in the North, because of that greed from top to bottom.”

Mr. McCall said that the company had intended to shut the mine down for the winter anyway — strike or not.

But spokesman for Cyprus Anvil, Barry Redfern, refuted the accusations. “We want to get the mine fully operational as soon as possible.”

FINALE

Bob Hilker questioned the righteousness of 400 Steelworkers taking on the Anti-Inflation Board. The consulting geologist said, “It’s fishy!”

Mr. Hilker, with his Whitehorse firm, R.G. Hilker, Ltd., is vice-chairman of the local chapter of the CIM (Canadian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy).

“Labor is getting too expensive,” he remarked. “It’s going to put Canada’s minerals out of the market.”

He said, “There’s no way the Yukoners can continue to pay revenue losses for a multi-million dollar industry. The Yukon needs legislation with teeth in it.”

He thinks provincehood may be the answer.

The undaunted Erik Nielsen, the Yukon’s Member of Parliament, continues tabling resolutions for Yukon provincial status in Parliament. This session will be no exception to the rule for Mr. Nielsen’s endeavors. As usual, resolutions aren’t expected to pass.

MLA Fred Berger said that the Yukon can raise only 80 per cent of the gross revenue needed to run the territory. Mr. Berger, leader of the Yukon’s NDP (New Democratic Party), said, “Provincial status is the wrong issue. It’s responsible government we want, the running of our day-to-day affairs.”

Commissioner Pearson is sympathetic to the concept of self-government for the Yukon. In November, the new commissioner will sit for the first time with the 12 elected members when the Yukon legislative assembly reconvenes.

Stay tune, as they say! The whole Yukon issue may be the survival of the fittest!

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